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See You Later / Au Revoir
Canada / 17:25 / 1990 / sound / colour
"The action depicted here is simplicity itself; a man (Snow himself) rises from his desk, puts on his coat, says goodbye to a woman typing at a nearby desk, and leaves the room. But what took a mere 30 seconds in 'real' time had been recorded with a Super Slo-Mo video camera (developed for sports broadcasting) and further processed before the final transfer to film, being expanded to a full 18 minutes. With the continuous right-to-left pan in smooth and constant motion, taken from a fixed tripod position, the whole image- with arriving and departing frame details- is fully equal in interest and importance to the 'event' depicted.

"The staged action is intentionally mundane, so the extreme slowness of the change focuses attention on the subtlest of details, to reveal an exceptional grace and beauty, normally hidden. A first viewing for the film can be oddly tension filled, as the viewer wonders what will happen next; slow motion generally portends something. When the brevity and non-drama of the film are confirmed, however, one tends to want to see it again. See You Later and watch for other elements in the image.

"...Audio is also integral, consisting only in the sound of the typewriter (slowed, of course, to a deep and mysterious rumble) and the words exchanged by the two protagonists (he: 'Goodbye,' she: 'See You Later'). The film's credits appear to be the material having been typed on the screen. In this work, Snow continues his study of the cinematic elements: Time and duration are made palpable. For him, film techniques and components are active protagonists, as they have been in 'One Second in Montreal' (1969) or with the zoom of 'Wavelength' (1967) and pan of 'La Region Centrale' (1971). The idea for this film came to Snow as early as 1968, when he saw it complete in his mind, almost as a vision. It was the fortuitous offer of access to the Super Slo-Mo camera in 1990 that finally made its completion possible." - Peggy Gale
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16mm
Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Centre
32 Lisgar Street
Toronto ON Canada M6J 0C9
Monday - Thursday / 10:00 - 18:00
(416)  588 - 0725
Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Centre
32 Lisgar Street
Toronto ON Canada M6J 0C9
Monday - Thursday / 10:00 - 18:00
(416)  588 - 0725