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*Corpus Callosum
Canada / 1:32:00 / 2002 / sound / colour
The "Corpus Callosum" is a central region of tissue in the human brain which passes messages between the two hemispheres. "Corpus Callosum" the film (or tape, or projected light work) is constructed of, depicts, creates, examines, presents, consists of, and is betweens. Between beginning and ending, between natural and artificial, between fiction and fact, between hearing and seeing, between 1956 and 2002. It's a tragi-comedy of the cinematic variables.

"Corpus Callosum" juxtaposes or counterpoints a realism of normal metamorphosis (two extreme examples: pregnancy, explosions) in believable, real interior spaces with impossible shape changes (some made possible with digital animation). First the camera, then we in the audience, observes the observations of the real people depicted in the obviously staged situations. What we see and what they see is involved in shifting modes of belief. There seem to be (though there is no narrative) a Hero and Heroine. However, from scene to scene they are different people costumed identically or altered electronically. The sound electronic like the picture is also a continuous metamorphosis and as the film's nervous system, is as important to the film as the picture. Or: the sound and the picture are two hemispheres joined by the artist. "Corpus Callosum" is resolutely artificial; it not only wants to convince, but also to be a perceived pictorial and musical phenomenon. (Michael Snow)

This is structural film meets digital technology. "Corpus Callosum" uses the high-end film animation software "Houdini" developed in Canada and used in the films "The Titanic" and "Apollo 13", the engineers won a techical Oscar for its development. This is the first usage in an experimental film.
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digi-beta pal 16mm beta sp ntsc
Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Centre
32 Lisgar Street
Toronto ON Canada M6J 0C9
Monday - Thursday / 10:00 - 18:00
(416)  588 - 0725
Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Centre
32 Lisgar Street
Toronto ON Canada M6J 0C9
Monday - Thursday / 10:00 - 18:00
(416)  588 - 0725