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Artist Spotlight Series: Roberto Ariganello
CFMDC Special Edition
DVD
Roberto Ariganello was a passionate believer in the importance of independent film. Working in a variety of styles and genres, he experimented with narrative and documentary form, playfully exploring the use of appropriated imagery and the relationship between sound and picture. His solo and collaborative films offer humorous and thoughtful alternatives to the conventions of mainstream media and consumer culture. 


Study guide includes an essay by James Missen.


CLICK HERE to download study guide.
“Yesterday's Wine” is a found-footage film that explores the nature of filmmaking by deconstructing the violence common to commercial, narrative cinema.  Constructed from old regular and Super 8mm films, with a dialogue created from language tapes, the film also examines the self-referential nature of filmmaking. Inspired surrealism and dadaism, disparate material is brought together through intuitive associations to create an absurd homage to old and obscure cinema.
2001 / 16mm / 8min
“Shelter” is a multi-layered experimental film that cleverly weaves archival social commentary and recent political activism in a playful analysis of our culture's misplaced priorities. The film blends a variety of appropriated material - including a homeless demonstration during the gala premiere of an Atom Egoyan film at the Toronto Film Festival - with archival footage of circuses, westerns, and Pierre Burton discussing the pros and cons of building a bomb shelter. 


“Shelter” also celebrates the inherent qualities of  the film medium, qualities that have quickly become marginalized through the current obsession with digital technology.
1995 / 16mm / 6min
“Non-Zymase Pentathlon” makes use of the commercial imagery of post-war North America, culled from the pages of Life, Maclean's, National Geographic, and their ilk, animating these pictures in absurd and arbitrary juxtapositions.  Animals, people, consumer goods, military equipment, and other detritus float across different planes in an ambiguous film-space. The film is structured into five “events,” preceded by a brief introduction.
2000 / 16mm / 22 min
Contrafacta is a collage animation made by Toronto filmmakers Roberto Ariganello and Chris Gehman. Using images from medieval artworks, and quotations from the writings of medieval mystics and poets, Contrafacta creates a web of related images and events without a simple connective narrative. 


“This painstakingly crafted medievalist tale... conjure[s] a dreamland of floating royals and waltzing unicorns. Birth, death, plague and the farming of souls all rub shoulders in this episodic surrealist fable. In a dance of grace and punishment where miracles are commonplace, we follow the descent of a royal egg which hatches the changing shape of the world.” - Mike Hoolboom, Images Festival, 2000


“Every work here is characterized by a rare modesty (of means and/or of ego), but it would be wrong to equate this with a lack of ambition. To wit: Contrafacta. The horror of an incomprehensible world ruled by an unfathomable God is expressed through sublime cutout animation; medieval art moves to a creepy and funny soundtrack, inadvertently inventing a new genre: spiritual slapstick." - Daniel Cockburn, "Cinema Naivete," 2006
“Lotería” is an impressionistic documentary comprised of a series of interviews with street vendors, lottery officials, and the children responsible for drawing the winning numbers. These children, referred to as “gritones” (they literally shout out the numbers), are employed because their innocence is considered incorruptible.


Rather than taking a conventional reportage approach, “Lotería” presents Mexico’s lottery as a visual and auditory phenomenon. The illusionary quality of the lottery as a part of Mexico’s cultural history is represented through the textured layers of the film’s sound and photography. Shot on both colour and black and white, Super 8 and 16mm, with optical visual effects as well as music recorded on the streets of Mexico City, “Lotería” eschews the traditional expository documentary form, offering instead an imaginative, observational approach. 


Spanish with English sub-titles.
None available. 
Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Centre
32 Lisgar Street
Toronto ON Canada M6J 0C9
Monday - Thursday / 10:00 - 18:00
(416)  588 - 0725
Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Centre
32 Lisgar Street
Toronto ON Canada M6J 0C9
Monday - Thursday / 10:00 - 18:00
(416)  588 - 0725