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Artist Spotlight Series: Steven Woloshen
CFMDC Special Edition
DVD
Steven Woloshen has mastered the art of direct animation in a series of explosively creative films. Straddling the terrain between the joyfully entertaining and conceptually rigourous, Woloshen’s virtuouso play with film’s most basic elements re-imagines the relationship between colour, sound and the moving image. 


Study guide includes an essay by Chris Gehman, independent writer & programmer.
1982 / 16mm / 2:30 / sound / colour
A subtle little narrative; an abstracted interlude between sound and silence, motion and stability, and light and darkness. 

“Son of Dada” is the first act of the 16mm “Shadows and Caves” triptych that were produced between 1982-1984. In the first act, letters become forms, having been stripped from the context of words and language, and ultimately, from the logic of sentences. 

What remains? Pure cinema, perhaps … language-written … on the threshold of liberty and silence within the grips of suspense.
1983 / 16mm / 2:30 / sound / colour
A blistering life-or-death run through cinema’s graphic jungle. 

“Didre Novo”, the second act of the “Shadows and Caves” triptych, establishes the second set of scientific criteria the language of movement on screen. Is it possible to perceive sound as movement? The perception of depth is the cave path ahead of us, and the sun’s light is beginning to diminish with every footstep we take. 
1984 / 16mm / 3:00 / sound / colour
This is the final confrontation with uncertainty. The sheer terror and joy of tomorrow’s newspaper – delivered today! In this, the third and final act of the “Shadows and Caves” triptych, the social and scientific dialectic between form, texture, and abstract and representational images puts forward the question: does one plus one equal three?
1999 / 35mm / 3:30m / sound / colour
“Get Happy”, as the title suggests, is a joyous carefree romp through the swinging world of Benny Goodman and his orchestra. 

This richly textured “cameraless” animation propels the audience through the highs, lows, and refrains of a big-band classic. With a new sound synchronization formula, “Get Happy” delivers an unabashed stream-of-consciousness, fluid with several well-delivered visual punches and crescendos. In Cinemascope.
2000 / 16mm / 2:00 / sound / colour
The magnificence of the solar winds, the unseen emissions from the centre of the galaxy. 

In Woloshen’s first film of the 21st century, a new cameraless animation engraving technique seeks to capture a new spectrum of light from the centre of the solar system and the core of the projector’s lamp. Is the cinema’s screen a litmus paper of the projector’s activity?
2001 / 35mm / 3:00 / sounds / colour
“Ditty Dot Comma” is the first motion picture musical salute to visual punctuation. Set to the cool jazz styling of drummers Buddy Rich and Gene Krupa, and including the pulsating piano rhythms of Oscar Peterson, we make this musical leap into this abstract animated film. Using animated shapes, drawn directly onto the film’s emulsion, Woloshen opens the door into the abstract world, and propels the audience into a pure widescreen experience. Liberated from plotlines, language and recognizable forms, a universal film experience emerges, suitable for all ages and nationalities.
2001 / 35mm / 4:00 / sound / colour
The “Babble on Palms” is a lush and vibrant cameraless animation, combining found footage, scratch and inking techniques with the universal language of music.

Individuality, censorship, shared experiences, and unseen auras are just some of the topics examined in this short experimental animation by Canadian filmmaker, Steven Woloshen. Perhaps, when our ears cease to listen, the "Babble on" palms, speak. Made on September 12th, 2001 in response to the previous day’s event. 

Suitable for all ages and audiences.
2002 / 35mm / 2:00 / sound / colour
“BRU HA HA!” An overexcited and noisy response. A Commotion. A hubbub or an uproar. “BRU HA HA!” A short hand-scratched film by Steven Woloshen! A film about relationships of the human kind. Homage to painter Joan Miro.
2002 / 35mm / 3:00 / sound / colour
The enduring romance of lines is explored in this colourful handmade cameraless animation by Montreal animator Steven Woloshen. Dave Brubeck’s classic jazz standard “Take Five” is the starting point of this abstract visual interpretation. In Cinemascope.

“I began this film in my usual fashion, which is to say, I hadn’t planned any narratives, characters or sections as starting points for this animation. As I worked and listened to the track - at least twenty times - the line drawing (representing the sound of a saxophone) was leading me either to one side of the frame or the other. The main colours began to dominate, and I was sectioning my parts into choruses, solos and refrains. Although ‘Take Five’ is a jazz standard, I feel that this is structured more as a pop tune.” - Steven Woloshen

Awards: Best Non-Narrative Film, I Castelli Animati Festival, Rome, Italy, 2003 
2003 / Video / 1:00 / sound / colour
A handmade, minute-made motion picture essay on colour harmonics, visual overtones, and the rhythms of an abstract encounter.
2004 / 35mm / 4:00 / sound / colour
Sometimes, rifts between us are as wide as rivers, and sometimes, as small as hair lines. Using bleaching and painting techniques on found footage, “Two Eastern Hair Lines” explores communication, conflict and isolation. 

“West of the pass you will meet no more old friends.” - Tang Dynasty poem

Awards: Jutra Nomination for Best Animation, 2004
2004 / 35mm / 2:00 / sound / colour
Shards of film fly off the screen while the music of Fats Waller plays on! In this short abstract film, coloured ink and small pieces of film stock are heaped directly on the film’s surface. “This film was made in the weeks preceding the birth of my first child. It was my intention to create a fast-moving, colourful style that a very young child could respond to. I’ll see in the years that follow if I was right or not,” Steven Woloshen.
2005 / 35mm / 3:30 / sound / colour
Sex, birth, fire and fingerprints. A passion play and the events of conception that result in mayhem. A rock’n’roll theme, in Cinemascope!

Nominated for Best Animation at the 2006 Jutra Awards.
2005 / 35mm / 2:00 / sound / colour
A brief history...

At the Annecy International Animation Festival of 2005, a short abstract animation entitled, “Spiral” was presented in the opening night ceremony. The “unknown” abstract filmmaker, J.W.Murton, was credited with this work. “Spiral” was introduced at the opening ceremony as a rare abstract film made in the tradition of Walter Ruttman and Oscar Fleshenger. Sounds very good...except...The real author of “Spiral” was none other than Bill Plympton. His real motive for making this film - contempt - both for abstract films and filmmakers and the funding that goes with the territory. And now, it’s time for a

Rebuttal!
2006 / 35mm / 1:00 / sound / colour
Is my daughter Evan like a puzzle?  Just when I think everything is going well, either a germ will attack or a new emotion will surface.

I hear that children change every week.   When I was making this film, my daughter was invaded by the chicken pox virus.  I was convinced that I must finish this film as quickly as possible because her health was directly linked to its completion.

Honourable mention by the Canadian Film Centre at the 2006 Ottawa International Animation Festival.
2006 / 35mm / 4:30 / sound / colour
This short film is about the consequences of my personal choices and the lessons that I’m doomed to repeat. I have chosen, as subject, to animate the Tibetan letter “AH” in the traditional U-Chan form to demonstrate - in the way of a simple visual metaphor - some of the differences between Karma and my freedom to choose.

This film is constructed as a visual “process loop” and may be screened once or repeatedly.

Sacred chants by Tibetan Buddhist monks.

Colour by Technicolor, Montreal.
Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Centre
32 Lisgar Street
Toronto ON Canada M6J 0C9
Monday - Thursday / 10:00 - 18:00
(416)  588 - 0725
Canadian Filmmakers Distribution Centre
32 Lisgar Street
Toronto ON Canada M6J 0C9
Monday - Thursday / 10:00 - 18:00
(416)  588 - 0725